How To: Ombré

IMG_1572

Hello lovelies,

Some of you may have noticed, especially if you follow me on other media platforms, that I have changed my hair recently. I visited home and decided, on a whim not gonna lie, that I would like a change and a spot of colour for summer. Having always been brunette or a redhead, I knew that what I wanted wasn’t going to be easy but I also wanted to prove that dark dyed hair can take new things. I am proud of my finished brown-blonde ombré look and thought I’d leave some tips to help anyone else out there interested in a change for summer.

PicFrame-12The first thing I purchased was the Loreal Ombre box itself for dark brown hair. I applied it with the brush included from the ear down, as instructed and the results were kinda dodgy. The brush did not work well for starters so application wasn’t generous, nor did it pick out the odd few hairs to highlight gradually as advertised. It came out as a big block of colour and, as photographed, the lengths of my hair were a notable orange. It looked nothing like the box and was not a good look so I hid my head in my hood, in embarrassment, and nipped to the local supermarket for something different. I do not recommend this product to anyone with dark hair- if you truly want blonde ombré you will have to use peroxide.

 

IMG_2953I picked up the Loreal Perfect Blonde Creme Highlights which I had spotted and ignored in a few ombré recommendations because the posts and product seemed outdated. The box comes with two sachets of powder peroxide and one bottle of development, a mixing tray and a stick/brush. I mixed one packet first, brushed out my hair across my back and got my (incredibly patient) stepdad to carefully paint the ends of hair. As I have long hair we painted a good three inches in peroxide and left it for 45 minutes before rinsing and drying.

 

IMG_1564At this point I was a very firm self-assured yellow but this did not dishearten me as it had very obviously lightened and bleached it a good few stages more than orange. So, unphased, we mixed all of the other packet and what was left of the developer and painted the same ends again using half of the second mixture. We also picked out a few bits of hair to highlight this time, in order to blend and get that gradual change from brown to blonde without having block colours. After washing off and drying, my hair was a further lighter blonde but I still wanted the yellowness gone.

Slightly more apprehensive on the third application of bleach, my hair remained defiant, strong and incredibly undamaged and unphased. We conquered another 45 minutes of peroxide and the ends took well. I was rewarded for my bravery by achieving a very pretty light blonde- some parts of the hair even came out white blonde.

IMG_1572I am very happy with the results but cannot stress enough that peroxide is the absolute worst thing you can inflict upon your hair and, just because I withstood three 45 minute sessions is not to say that I recommend anyone else should. I have very oily and healthy hair so this was not so much a problem for me as the ends are now normal to mildly dry at worst. If your hair is already damaged from heat or rough brushing or recent colouring then stay away from peroxide.

That being said, there are ways of both treating your newly damaged hair and maintaining your colour. I purchased two conditioners- one bottle of Aussie 3 Minute Miracle Reconstruction to nourish and protect my hair but also use the John Frieda Sheer Blonde, Go Blonder conditioner underneath to both maintain the blonde and also lighten it.

Sorry for the poor quality of photos. Some were taken in the evening as and when the dying was done and the finished product photo was taken just now before I post this.

I hope this has offered enough advice of what to do and what not to do and if any of you try this out for yourselves do let me know how it goes because it’d be interesting to see what it does to different hair types. Just remember to look after your locks!

Hannah x

Follow:

1 Comment

Leave a Reply